508 Angus St, Gretna, Nebraska 68028
402.332.4444
stpatrick.gre@archomaha.org

Your Word is a lamp for my feet, a light for my path.

Join us in person at Mass!

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Deepen Your Faith with St Patrick Church

There are many ways you can deepen your faith and walk with God being offered now by our church.  Also, stay tuned for announcements about spring programs including a new bible study!

Christ Renews His Parish

Christ Renews his parish is a weekend focused on personal renewal and ultimately, renewal as a spiritual community.  The men’s weekend is March 20-21 and the women’s weekend is February 27-28.

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Year of St Joseph

Pope Francis proclaimed a Year of Saint Joseph from December 8, 2020 to December 8, 2021.  A plenary indulgence will be granted to Catholics who complete an act honoring St Joseph.

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Chosen Video Series

The Chosen is a new television drama based on the life of Jesus Christ.  The series portrays Jesus “through the eyes of those who met him.”

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Learn About Catholic Faith

This page within our own website offers explanations of our faith and links to various sites with more information.

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Join Father Baxter for

Virtual Sunday Mass

Each Weekend ~ Available on St. Patrick YouTube Channel

ST PATRICK YOUTUBE CHANNEL

In these uncertain times, we the community of St. Patrick Catholic Church in Gretna can still come together to pray and celebrate the Mass.
During this time of social distancing it is more important now than ever to unite ourselves as one parish.
To provide everyone Mass from our beautiful church, and allow all to participate whether in person or at home,
Mass will still be recorded and made available for you to celebrate at your convenience anytime.

Please Note:  while Mass is being celebrated, ALL doors to the Church will be locked.

Remember to Subscribe to the St Patrick YouTube Channel and set a reminder for mass!

May God bless and keep you safe, healthy, and positive until we gather in the Lord’s house together again!

WHO WE ARE

The community of St Patrick is one of faith and commitment to the Lord.

We, the faithful community of St. Patrick, are using our collective gifts to serve the Lord and one another.  Through worship, faith, formation, education, and outreach we strive to be a sign of Christ’s presence in our community and the world.

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MASS TIMES

The Mass is our most important prayer as Catholic Christians. The Church tells us that celebrating the Mass is the “source and summit” of our Christian life.

WEEKEND MASSES

Saturday – 5 PM
Sunday – 8 AM, 10 AM, Noon
REVIEW GUIDELINES FOR ATTENDANCE

Process & Guidelines
DAILY MASSES

Tuesday – Evening Mass at 6:00 PM
Wednesday – Morning Mass at 7:30 AM
Thursday – Evening Mass at 6:00 PM
Friday – Morning Mass at 7:30 AM

HOLY DAYS OF OBLIGATION

Morning Mass at 7:30 AM
Evening Mass at 6:00 PM

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RECONCILIATION

Saturday – 4:00-4:40 PM
Click to see NEW process and guidelines

Learn MoreProcess and Guidelines

Building Access

Main East Entrance (Narthex) – Open 7 days a week, 6:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Please remember to respect social distancing rules of staying a minimum of six feet apart.

Weekend Masses Only:
– All church entrances unlocked half hour prior to start of Mass
– All church entrances locked five minutes after Mass begins
– Main East Entrance South Door (Narthex) opened by security guard only

Church Basement / Elevator – locked around-the-clock every day of the week
Conference / Meeting Rooms – available for limited use with the approval of the parish office

Contact Office for Access Arrangements

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What commitments have changed your life? “I promise…” Not only do these words require that our deeds match our words, but they also demand that we change to match our words. The vows of marriage, for example, mean abandoning the single life, a change of job or school means old friends and habits are lost or at least different. In Mark's gospel, we are given an invitation to change, to make a new commitment. Jesus asks us, “repent, and believe in the gospel…come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

Now at first, this invitation may seem like it is only directed towards the first disciples, they were fisherman after all. And how many of us today are fishermen by profession? Yeah, not very many of us. But Jesus’ invitation to the early disciples is still an invitation to us. What He is asking us to do is to repent from our sinful nature, believe in Him, follow Him, and if we do all of that He will make us “fishers of men” – witnesses, disciples, leaders of the faith, people whom others look to find Christ. We will become the ones who lead others to God.

Notice that Jesus called four men in the gospel today, Simon who later becomes Peter, Andrew, James, and his brother, John. And notice that all four responded immediately, leaving their livelihood to follow Jesus. They left their nets, their boats, their coworkers, their family, everything, and they follow Jesus. In the static culture that did not change from generation to generation, that they were living in, Jesus preached something new. They recognized that Jesus was the embodiment of the Good News, that God had come to change everything, and Jesus’ preaching and His invitation established this new relationship with God. For their own reasons, the first four disciples left the safety of their family and friends for the challenge of a new life based on this new message. They responded to the call, the invitation of Jesus, for they wanted to live with Him. The call of Jesus was more important than any security, any relationship, any possession they had.

We too, in a way, have already answered Jesus’ call through our baptism. However, we all fall into sin time and time again, therefore we are constantly given the opportunity to accept Jesus’ invitation over and over again. Jesus calls us to repent, to recommit ourselves to Him through the sacrament of Reconciliation. This is the message He preached to the first disciples and it is still the message He gives us today. How well are you living out your commitment to Christ right now? Are you long over due to receive His mercy and His grace in the sacrament of Reconciliation? Are you prepared to leave everything in this life behind you to live a devout life in Christ?
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What commitments have changed your life? “I promise…” Not only do these words require that our deeds match our words, but they also demand that we change to match our words. The vows of marriage, for example, mean abandoning the single life, a change of job or school means old friends and habits are lost or at least different. In Marks gospel, we are given an invitation to change, to make a new commitment. Jesus asks us, “repent, and believe in the gospel…come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”  Now at first, this invitation may seem like it is only directed towards the first disciples, they were fisherman after all. And how many of us today are fishermen by profession? Yeah, not very many of us. But Jesus’ invitation to the early disciples is still an invitation to us. What He is asking us to do is to repent from our sinful nature, believe in Him, follow Him, and if we do all of that He will make us “fishers of men” – witnesses, disciples, leaders of the faith, people whom others look to find Christ. We will become the ones who lead others to God.  Notice that Jesus called four men in the gospel today, Simon who later becomes Peter, Andrew, James, and his brother, John. And notice that all four responded immediately, leaving their livelihood to follow Jesus. They left their nets, their boats, their coworkers, their family, everything, and they follow Jesus. In the static culture that did not change from generation to generation, that they were living in, Jesus preached something new. They recognized that Jesus was the embodiment of the Good News, that God had come to change everything, and Jesus’ preaching and His invitation established this new relationship with God. For their own reasons, the first four disciples left the safety of their family and friends for the challenge of a new life based on this new message. They responded to the call, the invitation of Jesus, for they wanted to live with Him. The call of Jesus was more important than any security, any relationship, any possession they had.  We too, in a way, have already answered Jesus’ call through our baptism. However, we all fall into sin time and time again, therefore we are constantly given the opportunity to accept Jesus’ invitation over and over again. Jesus calls us to repent, to recommit ourselves to Him through the sacrament of Reconciliation. This is the message He preached to the first disciples and it is still the message He gives us today. How well are you living out your commitment to Christ right now? Are you long over due to receive His mercy and His grace in the sacrament of Reconciliation? Are you prepared to leave everything in this life behind you to live a devout life in Christ?
One of the joys of being in the Year of St. Joseph is learning about all things St. Joseph. Below is a slideshow created by Aleteia of gorgeous St. Joseph Churches around the globe. These are just to name a few Im sure, but what a blessing it is to learn more about such a great saint.  https://aleteia.org/slideshow/slideshow-the-churches-around-the-world-named-for-st-joseph/
Friday Funny  Two guys were walking through a game park and they came across a lion that had not eaten for days. The lion stared chasing the two men. They ran as fast as they could. One of the guys, getting tired, decided to say a prayer, Please turn this lion into a Christian, Lord. He looked back to see if the lion was still chasing them and he saw the lion on its knees. Happy to see his prayer was answered, he turned around and headed towards the lion. As he came closer to the lion, he heard the lion saying a prayer: Thank you Lord for the food I am about to receive.

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That is funny even on a Saturday! GBY

Tomorrow is the Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children. Let us pray together for the safety and protection of those poor innocent  unborn children in our nation and our world.  Lord Jesus, I firmly believe that the Blessed Sacrament is Your very Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity. Senses cannot grasp this marvel. Faith, however, reaches beyond what the eyes can see and assures us that You are present. Grant, O Lord, that our faith in the Eucharist may also strengthen our ability to recognize the dignity of every human life. We know that the senses can fool us there as well. Some may not be attractive, others may seem too small, some may appear as less than human. But we, who can see You in the Sacred Host, can certainly see you in our brothers and sisters. We can also see You, O Lord, in the children in the womb. In a day when so many have forgotten these children, and dismiss them as less valuable than those who are born, grant that we may grow all the more convinced of their dignity and worth. Then grant, O Lord, that we may act accordingly. Amen.
Have you heard? This year, St. Patrick Preschool will be holding a different kind of fundraiser. A small committee will be designing a parish cookbook using our parishioners favorite recipes. Our parish has not had a published cookbook for over 26 years so we are long overdue. Using the website, Typensave, a tool from Morris Press Cookbooks, we will be able to create the entire cookbook online.  Please consider sharing some of your favorite family recipes. To submit a recipe or many recipes, simply go to the website below and enter the username and password and click on:  ADD RECIPE.  All recipes must be submitted online by February 28.  WEBSITE:  https://www.typensave.com/get-started/
USERNAME:  StPatsCookbook
PASSWORD:  salt820

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Joe McCampbell Hope McCampbell Alicia Elson

We proclaim the creed every time we attend Mass but how often do we focus on the meaning of the words we are saying? I believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic church. These are what we call the four marks of the Church.  One - Jesus came to establish one Church, there is but one body of Christ. There is meant to be unity within, not a divide amongst Christians.  Holy - The word holy means to be set apart. Jesus told us to be the salt and the light of the world, in other words we are called to be an example for the rest of the world. However we still recognize that we are a community of sinners, striving to live holy lives.  Catholic - The word catholic actually means universal. For this reason the early disciples dispersed and taught all nations about Jesus, welcoming them into the Body of Christ. We are called to do the same.  Apostolic - Jesus established the church with the apostles and tradition reminds us that we are connected with those first apostles. We can trace the ministry of our bishops and the pope all the way back to the apostles through apostolic succession. Just so, we are called to continue that tradition for many more generations.  These are the roots of our faith. This is the example we are called to live by our lives. Let us pray for unity not only within the Catholic Church, but amongst all Christians. Jesus help us to truly live as the Body of Christ.

When John the Baptist saw Jesus, he proclaimed "Behold, the Lamb of God!" While this title might strike us as odd, the proclaimed title caused two followers to quickly follow Jesus. Why? As gentle, docile animals, lambs were prized for their tender meat and fine coat; in other words, they gave all they had for their masters. The "Lamb of God" referred to the sacrificial animal, slaughtered at the Temple for the Passover meal (the same day Jesus was crucified).

In this title, Lamb of God, the themes of discipleship, sacrifice, and meal are woven together. The same themes we use to describe the Eucharist. The declaration "The Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world" which we recite during the Mass, reveal both the character and the mission of Jesus. Through His love, Jesus accepted the role of the “Suffering Servant” as foretold by Isaiah, "He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth; like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is dumb, so he opened not his mouth." Jesus gave Himself to His Father for our sake in spite of suffering and death.

Not only do we discover this title of Jesus, the Lamb of God, but we also hear in today’s gospel that Jesus changed the name of Simon the son of John. But why? Jesus gave Simon a new identity. He called Simon by his formal name, Simon son of John, to clearly identify him. Then Jesus gave him his new name: "Cephas" (Aramaic for "Rock;" the Greek translated the word as "Petros," from which we get the name "Peter"). When Jesus gave Simon his new name, He defined the new disciple's role in the community. Simon was like solid rock, not a pebble or a stone that could be moved. Peter was a rock layer strong enough to securely build the foundation of a house. In light of the other gospels, Jesus gave Simon a leadership role with the new name. Remember that, in the time of Jesus, one's name revealed one's strength of character and abilities. In other words, a name defined one's power.

There is something beautiful about being called by name, but more than that our name bears meaning. What does your name mean, do you know?
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When John the Baptist saw Jesus, he proclaimed Behold, the Lamb of God! While this title might strike us as odd, the proclaimed title caused two followers to quickly follow Jesus. Why? As gentle, docile animals, lambs were prized for their tender meat and fine coat; in other words, they gave all they had for their masters. The Lamb of God referred to the sacrificial animal, slaughtered at the Temple for the Passover meal (the same day Jesus was crucified).  In this title, Lamb of God, the themes of discipleship, sacrifice, and meal are woven together. The same themes we use to describe the Eucharist. The declaration The Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world which we recite during the Mass, reveal both the character and the mission of Jesus. Through His love, Jesus accepted the role of the “Suffering Servant” as foretold by Isaiah, He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth; like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is dumb, so he opened not his mouth. Jesus gave Himself to His Father for our sake in spite of suffering and death.  Not only do we discover this title of Jesus, the Lamb of God, but we also hear in today’s gospel that Jesus changed the name of Simon the son of John. But why? Jesus gave Simon a new identity. He called Simon by his formal name, Simon son of John, to clearly identify him. Then Jesus gave him his new name: Cephas (Aramaic for Rock; the Greek translated the word as Petros, from which we get the name Peter). When Jesus gave Simon his new name, He defined the new disciples role in the community. Simon was like solid rock, not a pebble or a stone that could be moved. Peter was a rock layer strong enough to securely build the foundation of a house. In light of the other gospels, Jesus gave Simon a leadership role with the new name. Remember that, in the time of Jesus, ones name revealed ones strength of character and abilities. In other words, a name defined ones power.  There is something beautiful about being called by name, but more than that our name bears meaning. What does your name mean, do you know?
Monday starts the week of Prayer for Christian Unity. The theme this year is John 15:1-17, Abide in my love...you shall bear much fruit. We can only truly grow as a Christian community if we abide in Gods love first. To do so we need to turn to prayer, to trust that the Lord is working. If we want to see a difference in the world it has to begin with ourselves.  Graymoor Ecumenical & Interreligious Institute, a Ministry of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement, offers a daily prayer guide including scripture and a meditation. It can be found here: https://geii.org/week_of_prayer_for_christian_unity/prayer_worship/daily_scripture_and_prayer_guide.html
Friday Funny  A priest was walking along the corridor of the parochial school near the preschool wing when a group of little ones were trotting by on the way to the cafeteria. One little lad of about three or four stopped and looked at him in his clerical clothes and asked “Why do you dress funny?”  He told him he was a priest and this is the uniform priests wear.  Then the boy pointed to the priest’s plastic collar tab and asked, “Do you have an owie?”  The priest was perplexed until he realized that to him the collar tab looked like a band-aid.  So the priest took it out and handed it to the boy to show him.  On the back of the tab are raised letters giving the name of the manufacturer.  The little guy felt the letters, and the priest asked, “Do you know what those words say?”  “Yes I do,” said the lad who was not old enough to read.  Peering intently at the letters he said, “Kills ticks and fleas up to six months!”

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Funny funny on a frosty Friday!

Bless the LORD, O my soul, And all that is within me, bless His holy name. Bless the LORD, O my soul, And forget none of His benefits; Who pardons all your iniquities, Who heals all your diseases; Who redeems your life from the pit, Psalm 103:1-4.  This Psalm shows us what adoration looks like. We’re to praise or bless His name, and we’re to remember all of His benefits and blessings. These two things go together for a reason. When we adore God, when we praise and bless His name, it requires us to look up to Him and acknowledge who He is, our perfect and loving Father.  Adoring God is our way of returning the love He has for us. The love that is right and just to give Him for He is all good and all merciful. He is the one that gives us all we need and more.  We can adore God in many ways. Eucharistic Adoration for example, honoring God the Son in His presence on earth. Adoring God can also mean a silent prayer of praise for all that God has blessed you with. Your Father in Heaven loves you dearly, how are you going to return that love today?
January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. There are more than 40 million people who have been affected by human trafficking worldwide. To learn more about trafficking, visit Justice for Immigrant’s anti-trafficking page: https://bit.ly/3afmGrU.  Pope Francis described human trafficking as a scourge that wounds the dignity of our weakest brothers and sisters. Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery and occurs when a trafficker uses force, fraud or coercion to control another person for the purpose of engaging in commercial sex acts or soliciting labor or services against his/her will.  O St. Josephine Bakhita, assist all those who are trapped in a state of slavery; intercede with God on their behalf so that they will be released from their chains of captivity. Those whom man enslaves, let God set free. St. Josephine of Bakhita, patroness of victims of human trafficking, pray for us!
Law Enforcement Appreciation Day was Friday, January 8! Sister Stephanie Matcha, Notre Dame Sisters wrote a prayer for law enforcement and their families to commemorate the occasion.  Gracious God, Our Eternal Energy and Force, 
You have blessed our Country 
with brave men, women, K-9’s and horses 
who protect us and defend our freedom. 
May Your protection and Grace
surround them each day. 
Help us to Honor and Support them. 
May their families be blessed with strength 
for the sacrifices they make and the support 
they give to those who serve and protect. 
Let your healing hand be upon those 
who suffer wounds and injuries.
May those who have made the ultimate sacrifice 
rest forever in your Holy Presence. 
Comfort the families, co-workers and friends
who mourn and are left to remember 
the precious lives of their loved ones. 
Loving God, Your Heart is our Home, 
from you we have come, with You do we journey 
through these challenging days in our city and world. 
May our Law Enforcements’ Journey be blessed 
with Faith, Courage and Peace. Amen!

Today we celebrate the baptism of Jesus. The moment of our baptism was a moment of revelation and a public declaration that we are God’s. Many of us baptized as infants have no memory of our baptism, but that doesn’t mean it was any less of an important moment in our lives. It is through our baptism that God offers us the same relationship He had with Jesus, the offer to become His children, His daughters and sons.

In the time of Jesus, people had a limited knowledge of procreation. While they certainly understood how a wife conceived in union with her husband, they could not prove legitimacy of an heir. A public declaration of kinship was necessary for questions of legitimacy. In a male dominated, gender segregated society, men had a mistrust of their mates' moral character. While we have blood tests and DNA screening now, men back then only had the word of their wives. Since men held all the political and cultural power, only a father could declare his wife's child a "son." In Judaism, the rite of circumcision provided the stage for this declaration. Eight days after birth, a son was circumcised and named by his father before God. The rite not only brought the boy into a covenantal relationship with God, it brought the boy into a relationship with his father.

God gave us, and continues to give us, a choice for the Spirit and for divine childhood. The baptism of Jesus is our template. The choice for baptism means to act as God's child. You might not have had a choice in your baptism as a child, but you certainly have a choice to live out your baptism today. How can you act as a child of God this week?
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Today we celebrate the baptism of Jesus. The moment of our baptism was a moment of revelation and a public declaration that we are God’s. Many of us baptized as infants have no memory of our baptism, but that doesn’t mean it was any less of an important moment in our lives. It is through our baptism that God offers us the same relationship He had with Jesus, the offer to become His children, His daughters and sons.  In the time of Jesus, people had a limited knowledge of procreation. While they certainly understood how a wife conceived in union with her husband, they could not prove legitimacy of an heir. A public declaration of kinship was necessary for questions of legitimacy. In a male dominated, gender segregated society, men had a mistrust of their mates moral character. While we have blood tests and DNA screening now, men back then only had the word of their wives. Since men held all the political and cultural power, only a father could declare his wifes child a son. In Judaism, the rite of circumcision provided the stage for this declaration. Eight days after birth, a son was circumcised and named by his father before God. The rite not only brought the boy into a covenantal relationship with God, it brought the boy into a relationship with his father.  God gave us, and continues to give us, a choice for the Spirit and for divine childhood. The baptism of Jesus is our template. The choice for baptism means to act as Gods child. You might not have had a choice in your baptism as a child, but you certainly have a choice to live out your baptism today. How can you act as a child of God this week?
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