508 Angus St, Gretna, Nebraska 68028
402.332.4444
stpatrick.gre@archomaha.org

Jesus Christ is risen today!

Rejoin the Body of Christ at Mass!

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Eucharistic Adoration Chapel to be Constructed at St. Patrick

The Survey Says….It’s a ‘GO’

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“You must propagate veneration of the Most Blessed Sacrament with all your might, for the devotion to the Holy Eucharist is the queen of all devotions.”
– Pope Benedict XV

Deepen Your Faith with St Patrick Church

There are many ways you can deepen your faith and walk with God being offered now by our church.

Year of St Joseph

Pope Francis proclaimed a Year of Saint Joseph from December 8, 2020 to December 8, 2021.  A plenary indulgence will be granted to Catholics who complete an act honoring St Joseph.

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What Are You Missing in the Mass?

Join this study led by parishioner, Christa Pichler.  No materials or previous study required.  Just show up and learn more about the Mass!  In-person and online options offered!

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Chosen Video Series

The Chosen is a new television drama based on the life of Jesus Christ.  The series portrays Jesus “through the eyes of those who met him.”

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WHO WE ARE

The community of St Patrick is one of faith and commitment to the Lord.

We, the faithful community of St. Patrick, are using our collective gifts to serve the Lord and one another.  Through worship, faith, formation, education, and outreach we strive to be a sign of Christ’s presence in our community and the world.

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Join Father Baxter for

Virtual Sunday Mass

Each Weekend ~ Available on St. Patrick YouTube Channel

ST PATRICK YOUTUBE CHANNEL

In these uncertain times, we the community of St. Patrick Catholic Church in Gretna can still come together to pray and celebrate the Mass.
During this time of social distancing it is more important now than ever to unite ourselves as one parish.
To provide everyone Mass from our beautiful church, and allow all to participate whether in person or at home,
Mass will still be recorded and made available for you to celebrate at your convenience anytime.

Please Note:  while Mass is being celebrated, ALL doors to the Church will be locked.

Remember to Subscribe to the St Patrick YouTube Channel and set a reminder for mass!

May God bless and keep you safe, healthy, and positive until we gather in the Lord’s house together again!

MASS TIMES

The Mass is our most important prayer as Catholic Christians. The Church tells us that celebrating the Mass is the “source and summit” of our Christian life.

WEEKEND MASSES

Saturday – 5 PM
Sunday – 8 AM, 10 AM, Noon
REVIEW GUIDELINES FOR ATTENDANCE

Process & Guidelines
DAILY MASSES

Tuesday – Evening Mass at 6:00 PM
Wednesday – Morning Mass at 7:30 AM
Thursday – Evening Mass at 6:00 PM
Friday – Morning Mass at 7:30 AM

HOLY DAYS OF OBLIGATION

Morning Mass at 7:30 AM
Evening Mass at 6:00 PM

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RECONCILIATION

Saturday – 4:00-4:40 PM

Learn MoreProcess and Guidelines

Building Access

Main East Entrance (Narthex) – Open 7 days a week, 6:00 AM to 7:00 PM
Please remember to respect social distancing rules of staying a minimum of six feet apart.

Weekend Masses Only:
– All church entrances unlocked half hour prior to start of Mass
– All church entrances locked five minutes after Mass begins
– Main East Entrance South Door (Narthex) opened by security guard only

Church Basement / Elevator – locked around-the-clock every day of the week
Conference / Meeting Rooms – available for limited use with the approval of the parish office

Contact Office for Access Arrangements

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The JPII Newman Center has been working hard to build up young Catholic leaders to send out after their college experiences. This week they are doing a Student No-Call Phone-a-Thon to raise $50K.  You can help support them by visiting the givebutter link here: https://givebutter.com/JPII-Newman-Omaha?blm_aid=40044546.
Have you heard of the Sleeping St. Joseph devotion? Within the Year of St. Joseph this devotion has become more and more popular.  We know from the gospels that Joseph was visited by an angel in a dream to take Mary into his home. He had faith to trust the angel and took Mary and Jesus into his loving care. We too are in St. Josephs care as his adopted children.  As the devotions goes, whenever you have a problem or a special intention you can write it down and place it under a Sleeping St. Joseph statue and St. Joseph will take your prayers to the Lord while you sleep.  St. Joseph, foster father of the Redeemer, pray for us!
In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit The sign of the cross, the most well known Catholic prayer, the way we begin and end nearly every prayer. How often do we do this so mindlessly.  Every gesture that we make in the Catholic Church enriches the tradition and meaning of each prayer. The same goes for making the sign of the cross. When we do so in public, we make an act of faith. The action speaks volumes. We confess that we believe in the marks of Jesus and His saving power and that we trust the Triune God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) are protecting us. Additionally, if you make the sign of the cross 100 days in a row you can receive a plenary indulgence.  In the Byzantine tradition, the sign of the cross is made using either two fingers to signify the humanity and the divinity of Jesus or with three fingers symbolizing the Trinity.  The first mention of the sign of the cross was in the fifth century, however, it wasnt until the early Middle Ages that it became a common practice thanks to the influence of monasteries.  It is the holiest of all signs. Make a large cross, taking time, thinking what you do. Let it take in your whole being—body, soul, mind, will, thought, feelings, your doing and not-doing—and, by signing it with the cross, strengthen and consecrate the whole in the strength of Christ, in the name of the triune God. - Romano Guardini
Thank you to SYS-KOOL for being a sponsor for our new parish cookbook! Support local!
In October of 1859, Mary appeared to a Belgian immigrant woman, Adele Brise outside of what is now Champion, Wisconsin. Our Lady of Good Help is the only approved Marian apparition in the United States of America.  In the apparition, Mary identified herself as The Queen of Heaven who prays for the conversion of sinners. She instructed Adele to make general confession in various locations, to pray and offer communion for the conversion of sinners and to teach children the catechism, sacraments and salvation. Adele did as Mary had instructed her and became a missionary, walking a 50 mile radius gathering children together to teach them about the faith.  Almost 12 years to the date of the last Marian apparition, on October 8, 1871, one of the largest fires in American history broke out due to a drought in Peshtigo, Wisconsin. Local families who worked with Adele gathered together to pray the rosary and process around the chapel that had been built in the place of the apparitions. Their prayers were answered as the chapel and the Shrine grounds were preserved from the flame that burned down the town nearby.  To read more about Our Lady of Good Help visit there website: https://championshrine.org/the-story/

In today’s gospel Jesus appeared to His followers, gave them convincing proof of His resurrection, and opened their minds so they could preach about the Messiah. The appearance of the risen Lord was so new, it was outside the experience or comprehension of the disciples. They could not rightly interpret the experience or put it into a proper context. In fact, they were powerless. Only Jesus could validate the experience and supply its proper understanding, and He did just that. Jesus proved to the disciples that their experience was no hoax. Like the appearance to Thomas, Jesus showed His wounds and challenged His followers to "touch" Him. The experience of the Risen Lord was tactile.

Jesus reminded His disciples that He prophesied His resurrection during His earthly ministry. Then He "opened their minds to understand the Scriptures," specifically: the Law, the prophets, and the psalms. The "Law and the prophets" were code words for the Hebrew Scriptures which the Pharisees revered. The "Law...and the psalms" were revered by the Sadducees as basis for Temple worship. By including the term "psalms" with the "Law and the prophets" (an unusual combination), Luke not only wanted to change the interpretation of Scripture through the words of Jesus, but he also wanted to validate the newly developing forms of Christian worship. This change was a radical shift from the way Jesus' early Jewish followers lived. His followers needed to open their minds and hearts to new possibilities as they fulfilled the mandate to preach repentance and forgiveness everywhere in the name of Jesus. After all, they were witnesses to a new reality.

Holiness is not only a matter of ecstasy, touching the transcendent, while leaving the world behind. No, God reaches His people through His creation. This insight became the foundation of the Church's self-awareness as the Body of Christ. It also grounded the worship in the Church as sacramental.

A believer can encounter the Risen Christ through the bodily senses. Jesus’ followers saw, touched, and heard the Risen One. We see, hear, and touch Christ today through the sacraments, through shared witness and service to others.
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In today’s gospel Jesus appeared to His followers, gave them convincing proof of His resurrection, and opened their minds so they could preach about the Messiah. The appearance of the risen Lord was so new, it was outside the experience or comprehension of the disciples. They could not rightly interpret the experience or put it into a proper context. In fact, they were powerless. Only Jesus could validate the experience and supply its proper understanding, and He did just that. Jesus proved to the disciples that their experience was no hoax. Like the appearance to Thomas, Jesus showed His wounds and challenged His followers to touch Him. The experience of the Risen Lord was tactile.  Jesus reminded His disciples that He prophesied His resurrection during His earthly ministry. Then He opened their minds to understand the Scriptures, specifically: the Law, the prophets, and the psalms. The Law and the prophets were code words for the Hebrew Scriptures which the Pharisees revered. The Law...and the psalms were revered by the Sadducees as basis for Temple worship. By including the term psalms with the Law and the prophets (an unusual combination), Luke not only wanted to change the interpretation of Scripture through the words of Jesus, but he also wanted to validate the newly developing forms of Christian worship. This change was a radical shift from the way Jesus early Jewish followers lived. His followers needed to open their minds and hearts to new possibilities as they fulfilled the mandate to preach repentance and forgiveness everywhere in the name of Jesus. After all, they were witnesses to a new reality.  Holiness is not only a matter of ecstasy, touching the transcendent, while leaving the world behind. No, God reaches His people through His creation. This insight became the foundation of the Churchs self-awareness as the Body of Christ. It also grounded the worship in the Church as sacramental.  A believer can encounter the Risen Christ through the bodily senses. Jesus’ followers saw, touched, and heard the Risen One. We see, hear, and touch Christ today through the sacraments, through shared witness and service to others.
Happy birthday to St. Patrick Catholic Church!! On April 17, 1895 St. Patrick Catholic Church of Gretna was dedicated.  The parish was incorporated, according to the laws of Nebraska, as St. Patrick Church of Gretna on April 16, 1894. The church they would begin building on May 1, 1894 is the same south transept of St. Patrick Church still in use today. The church was completed in March of 1895 and dedicated on April 17, 1895 just days after Easter Sunday.  At the time, St. Patrick had a seating capacity of 240 persons, and there were 62 families and 310 parishioners. Now 126 years later look at how much we have grown! We can hold approximately 900 people in the church at one time and we have 1,562 registered families and 5,360 individual parishioners.  Check out our parish website for more history and growth within the church: https://stpatricksgretna.org/mesmerize/history-2/
Thank you to Prime Communications for your support for the new parish cookbook and for all that you do for us in the parish office. Support local!
Friday Funny  Its amazing how far we have come with technology in recent years but if you think about it Moses was far ahead of his time in regards to technology. He was the first man to download files from the cloud using a tablet you know.

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What a great timeless movie that was. “And his hair was perfect” FZ.

Thank you to another wonderful sponsor for the new parish cookbook!
Thank you to another great local sponsor for our new parish cookbook!

Are Catholics cannibals because they eat the body and blood of Jesus at Mass? I'm sure you've heard this question before (I know I have), but how does one explain this? Of course we are NOT cannibals! But we do believe that the body, blood, soul and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ is present in the Eucharist that we receive at Mass.

The easiest way to explain it is this: Catholics are not cannibals because we do not receive Jesus in a cannibalistic form (chewing, swallowing and metabolizing the flesh and blood of a human during or after a ritualistic killing). We receive Jesus in the form of bread and wine. Jesus is not killed in our reception of Him, we receive Him in His resurrected body.

To fully understand this we have to dive a bit deeper into the substance and accidentals of the Eucharist. The word, transubstantiation (when the bread and wine become the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus), literally means “transformation of the substance.” Substance refers to that which makes a thing essentially what it is. (Example: a man is made up of body, soul, intellect and will and if you remove any of these he is no longer a human person. However, the "accidentals" can change, things like: hair color, eye color, height, weight, etc.) Accidentals do not change the substance of the thing (or person).

As is true with the Eucharist. The substance (what it is) of bread and wine change into the body and blood of Jesus, but the accidentals (size, taste, texture of the bread and wine) remain the same.

In cannibalism, only parts of the body are consumed, but we receive all of Jesus in the Eucharist. This reception unites us mystically to the divine person of Jesus Christ which is far from what cannibalism is. Moreover, in cannibalism, once eaten the flesh of the victim is gone forever, but that is not the case with Jesus in the Eucharist. Billions of people can receive the same person of Jesus every day of the year for generations and yet He remains the same. We do not change Jesus one bit, but He in fact changes us.

Essentially, we receive the substance of the whole person of Jesus in the form of bread and wine. We do not destroy the flesh of Jesus nor does His body cease to exist by our consumption of Him: therefore, no Catholics are not cannibals.

Hopefully this helps you better understand the Eucharist and our consumption of Jesus. If you'd like to know more about the Catholic Church teaches on the Eucharist, I'd suggest checking out the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Part 2: the Celebration of the Christian Mystery, Section 2: the Seven Sacraments of the Church, Article 3: the Sacrament of the Eucharist) CCC 1322-1419.
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Are Catholics cannibals because they eat the body and blood of Jesus at Mass? Im sure youve heard this question before (I know I have), but how does one explain this? Of course we are NOT cannibals! But we do believe that the body, blood, soul and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ is present in the Eucharist that we receive at Mass.  The easiest way to explain it is this: Catholics are not cannibals because we do not receive Jesus in a cannibalistic form (chewing, swallowing and metabolizing the flesh and blood of a human during or after a ritualistic killing). We receive Jesus in the form of bread and wine. Jesus is not killed in our reception of Him, we receive Him in His resurrected body.  To fully understand this we have to dive a bit deeper into the substance and accidentals of the Eucharist. The word, transubstantiation (when the bread and wine become the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus), literally means “transformation of the substance.” Substance refers to that which makes a thing essentially what it is. (Example: a man is made up of body, soul, intellect and will and if you remove any of these he is no longer a human person. However, the accidentals can change, things like: hair color, eye color, height, weight, etc.) Accidentals do not change the substance of the thing (or person).  As is true with the Eucharist. The substance (what it is) of bread and wine change into the body and blood of Jesus, but the accidentals (size, taste, texture of the bread and wine) remain the same.  In cannibalism, only parts of the body are consumed, but we receive all of Jesus in the Eucharist. This reception unites us mystically to the divine person of Jesus Christ which is far from what cannibalism is. Moreover, in cannibalism, once eaten the flesh of the victim is gone forever, but that is not the case with Jesus in the Eucharist. Billions of people can receive the same person of Jesus every day of the year for generations and yet He remains the same. We do not change Jesus one bit, but He in fact changes us.  Essentially, we receive the substance of the whole person of Jesus in the form of bread and wine. We do not destroy the flesh of Jesus nor does His body cease to exist by our consumption of Him: therefore, no Catholics are not cannibals.  Hopefully this helps you better understand the Eucharist and our consumption of Jesus. If youd like to know more about the Catholic Church teaches on the Eucharist, Id suggest checking out the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Part 2: the Celebration of the Christian Mystery, Section 2: the Seven Sacraments of the Church, Article 3: the Sacrament of the Eucharist) CCC 1322-1419.
If you missed the Easter Vigil you might have missed the significance of lighting the paschal (or Easter) candle for the first time.  The Easter Vigil starts in darkness, a fire is lit. This fire represents the light of Christ. The paschal candle is the first candle to be lit and it is from that candle that the congregation lights their candles as a symbol of light (life) dispelling the darkness (death) in us.  Youll notice a few symbols on every paschal candle. First and most prominent, you will see a cross. You will also notice the Greek letters Alpha and Omega, meaning beginning and end (as is revealed about God in the book of Revelation). You will see the year, representing that God is present in our congregation here and now. Finally, in ever paschal candle there are five grains of incense (often in red) which are embedded in the candle to represent the five wounds of Christ (the three nails in His hands and feet, the thrust of the lance in His side, and the crown of thorns on His head). In our paschal candle, the incense is incased in wax nails (a common practice) that are pushed into the candle on the Easter Vigil.  The paschal candle remains lit during all Masses throughout Easter (which ends on Pentecost Sunday). It is also used during baptisms and funerals throughout the year to remind us to let our light shine before others as Jesus told us and as a reminder of hope in the resurrection.
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